68452
Movement Tracker Developed in Mashhad University
Movement Tracker Developed in Mashhad University

Movement Tracker Developed in Mashhad University

Movement Tracker Developed in Mashhad University

A researcher at Mashhad University of Medical Sciences has produced a wrist device (actigraphy tracker) aimed at giving individuals a better understanding of their daily movements.
Activity trackers have become big business in recent years with companies like Garmin and FitBit as well as Apple developing their own devices with the aid of smartphone applications.
According to Mahnaz Amini, a medical teacher at the university, the sensor diagnoses rest and activity patterns through monitoring their circadian rhythms, and provides a way to help them, Mehr News Agency reported.
Circadian rhythms are human natural cycles that control appetite, energy, mood and sleep, while actigraphy is the monitoring human rest and activity cycle. A small actigraph unit, also called actimetry sensor, is worn for a week or more to measure gross motor activity.
The unit is usually, in a wrist-watch-like package, worn on the wrist. The movements the actigraph unit undergoes are continually recorded and some units also measure light exposure. Data can be later read to a computer and analyzed offline.
Although there already are several foreign activity trackers in the market, Amini noted that the locally produced device is cheaper.
“Foreign models are in the market with an average price of $4,000. Production of the device inside the country cost 20 million rials ($550).”
She touched upon the hassles and pressures of modern living that can undermine the human balance and lead to insomnia or mood swings, saying actigraphy is an excellent tool for assessing potential rhythm disorders.
Amini stressed that the sensor is a non-invasive method that does not disrupt the individuals’ daily life.
Electric lights, including those which illuminate laptop computers, smartphones and tablets, often play a key role in disturbing people’s  sleep, the expert warned.
“Artificial lights disrupt the body’s natural rhythm, affect chemicals in the brain and drive people to use stimulants like caffeine to stay awake longer.”

 

Short URL : https://goo.gl/XZu5fH
  1. https://goo.gl/nb7e4a
  • https://goo.gl/i3T1qD
  • https://goo.gl/XbWS2o
  • https://goo.gl/vb6nGg
  • https://goo.gl/7y9U6Y

You can also read ...

TCCIM Doubles Down on Sound Forex Policies
By keeping the rial overvalued, the administration is in fact...
Iran needs to import around 800,000 tons of rice every year.
The temporary ban on rice imports has been lifted from Nov. 22...
The world’s 66 steelmakers produced 1.41 billion tons of steel during the 10 months, up 5.6% YOY.
Iranian steel mills produced 17.9 million tons of steel since...
Call for Prioritizing Financial  Ties During Visit of UK’s FM
Boosting banking relations with Britain is a top priority of...
Speculations About Gold Rally
The sudden leap in gold coins’ prices and their unprecedented...
For a Successful  Implementation of IFRS
In the Iranian banking world, the IFRS fever has been running...
The new store of South Korea’s largest convenience store chain CU opens in Tehran on Nov. 20. (Yonhap)
BGF Retail Company, the operator of South Korea’s largest...
Quake Damage to Kermanshah Agriculture Estimated
The recent earthquake that hit western Iran inflicted losses...

Add new comment

Read our comment policy before posting your viewpoints

Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.

Trending

Googleplus