Rich Get Richer From Fewer Labor Unions
World Economy

Rich Get Richer From Fewer Labor Unions

A study by the International Monetary Fund tracked three decades of income and found that as unionization declined, the wealth of the richest 10 percent in advanced countries showed a continuous increase.
More specifically, the study’s authors found that when researching income levels during the period of 1980-2010, the decline in unionization explained about half of the rise in incomes for the richest 10 percent, and half of the increase in the Gini coefficient (a measure of income inequality), RT reported.
“While some inequality can increase efficiency by strengthening incentives to work and invest, recent research suggests that higher inequality is associated with lower and less sustainable growth in the medium run, even in advanced economies,” argued the paper’s authors, Florence Jaumotte and Carolina Osorio Buitron.
The authors said traditional research has argued that the rise of inequality in advanced economies can be attributed to skill-based technology changes – such as new technology displacing workers – and globalization. They found that these developments led to some inequality changes at different rates and magnitudes, but not enough to account for the consistent increase in inequality that was being measured.
Researchers looked for answers in recent studies that made the claim that financial deregulation and lower taxes were another factor – but again, that wasn’t showing the steady increases that researchers were charting.
“…A rising concentration of income at the top of the distribution can reduce a population’s welfare if it allows top earners to manipulate the economic political system in their favor,” they wrote, referring to things such as lower taxes and business subsidies.
They then considered what effect the decline in unionization and a flat-lining minimum wage could have on wealth disparity. Previous research said such things were unlikely to have a direct impact, but that is not what Jaumotte and Buitron found. They took samples of advanced economies between 1980 and 2010 and considered gross income, labor market institutions and controls for globalization, financial liberalization, and common global trends.
“Our results confirm that the decline in unionization is strongly associated with the rise of income shares at the top...about half the increase...in net income is driven by deunionization,” said Jaumotte and Buitron.

Short URL : http://goo.gl/BZ6jSM

You can also read ...

Even though the US tariffs on their own may have a limited impact, global economic growth will slow should US trigger a trade war with  China or the European Union.
The volume of global trade grew faster than the world economy...
Since China’s entry into the World Trade Organization in 2001, it has become the most formidable  economic competitor the United States had even seen.
The US national debt exceeded $21 trillion for the first time...
S. Arabia Among World’s Worst Performing Property Markets
Saudi Arabia’s real estate market continued to be one of the...
OECD Finds No Consensus on Interim E-Commerce Taxes
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development’s...
Merkel Says Trying to Boost Domestic Demand
Germany is trying to stimulate domestic demand to offset...
Greece Looking Economically Vibrant on Road to Recovery
It’s nearly springtime in Athens: street trees are heavy with...
Gaza growth fell from 8% in 2016  to a mere 0.5% in 2017.
Gaza has seen conditions steadily deteriorate over the last...
2 Japan Airlines Plan Merger
Japanese airline group ANA Holdings has decided to consolidate...