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The happier mothers were in their relationship during and after pregnancy, the less likely they were to have an infant with colic.
The happier mothers were in their relationship during and after pregnancy, the less likely they were to have an infant with colic.

Unhappy Relationships May Influence Infant Fussiness

Unhappy Relationships May Influence Infant Fussiness

While colic is common among infants, a new study suggests that a mother’s relationship happiness and level of social support might play a role in the condition.
Researchers from Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) found that infants of mothers who reported low relationship happiness were more likely to have colic than infants of mothers who reported happier relationships.
Furthermore, the team found that mothers who reported receiving greater social support from their partners, friends, or family were less likely to have a baby with colic.
The findings were recently published in the journal Child: Care, Health and Development, medicalnewstoday.com reported.
Colic is a condition characterized by fussiness and excessive, inconsolable crying for more than 3 hours per day, 3 days per week, for more than 3 weeks. Babies with colic often cry at the same time each day, and most crying episodes occur in the late afternoon or evening. Around 20 to 25%  of babies experience colic, and the condition normally reaches a peak at 6 to 8 weeks of age. The causes are unknown, though intestinal gas, overfeeding, an immature nervous system, and lactose intolerance are believed to be some of the possible triggers.
Senior study author Kristen Kjerulff, professor of public health sciences at Penn State, and colleagues suggest that low relationship happiness and social support among mothers may put their infants at risk of colic.
The team reached their findings by assessing the data of 3,006 women aged between 18 and 35 years who were a part of Penn State’s First Baby Study. All women had given birth to their first child between January 2009 and April 2011.
As part of the study, mothers were required to report how happy they were with their spouses, how much social support they received from them, and the level of social support from family members and friends.
Around 11.6% of new mothers reported that their infant had colic.
Researchers found that the happier mothers were in their relationship during and after pregnancy, the less likely they were to have an infant with colic.
Additionally, the risk of colic was lower for infants of mothers who reported greater social support from spouses and family members. The team found that the more partners helped with infant care and the greater their love for the baby, the lower was an infant’s colic risk. Fathers played a significant role in their children’s risk of colic.

 

 

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