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Economy Major Concern for Incoming Parliament

Economy Major Concern for Incoming ParliamentEconomy Major Concern for Incoming Parliament

The next parliament needs to focus primarily on plans to help revive the domestic economy, a former vice president said.

"Creating an economic boom should be the main concern for the incoming Majlis," Mohammad Reza Aref also told IRNA on Tuesday.

The next parliamentary election is scheduled for February 26, alongside the Assembly of Experts vote.

"Given the current economic situation, people expect their demands to be the top priority. They demand, among other things, that their livelihood problems be addressed," a goal which is to be achieved through economic development, Aref said.

He was a candidate representing reformists in the 2013 presidential election, but withdrew in support of Hassan Rouhani, who ultimately came out the winner.Aref praised the Rouhani government's economic record so far, but said a lot more needs to be done to pull up the economy.

"The government has had some success in reining in inflation, but much more work is required to effectively bolster the economy," he said.

He pointed to the strained relationship between the government and parliament in recent years, noting that for the parliament to function efficiently, positive and harmonious relations should be established between the two bodies. "The Majlis needs calm to regain its true status and play an effective role in the country's progress and development," he said.

  Reformists' Election Policy

Aref, who is also the head of the Reformist Policymaking Council, said the council is drawing up a comprehensive plan, setting out reformists' agenda binding on the camp's parliamentary candidates.

"A comprehensive plan is being compiled presenting the details of the council's policy in the election, which once publicized must be followed by all candidates," he said. He denied reports that the council has assigned a committee to monitor the electoral campaign of rival principlists and mount "smear campaigns" when necessary.

"Such fabricated reports spreading every now and then are not uncommon."

 

     

 

Financialtribune.com