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Trump in South Korea Calls for North to Make a Deal
Trump in South Korea Calls for North to Make a Deal

Trump in South Korea Calls for North to Make a Deal

Trump in South Korea Calls for North to Make a Deal

In a striking shift of tone, US President Donald Trump abandoned his aggressive rhetoric toward North Korea on Tuesday, signaling a willingness to negotiate as he urged Pyongyang to “come to the table” and “make a deal.”
Trump, in his first day on the Korean peninsula, again pushed Pyongyang to abandon its nuclear weapons program, but sidelined apocalyptic threats for an optimistic note, saying confidently, if vaguely, that “ultimately, it’ll all work out,” AP reported.
 And while he said the United States would use military force if needed, he expressed his strongest inclination yet to deal with rising tensions with Pyongyang through diplomacy.
“It makes sense for North Korea to come to the table and make a deal that is good for the people of North Korea and for the world,” Trump said during a news conference alongside South Korean president Moon Jae-in. “I do see certain movement.”
Trump said he’s seen “a lot of progress” in dealing with North Korea though he stopped short of saying whether he wanted direct diplomatic talks.
Trump also underlined the United States’ military options, noting that three aircraft carrier groups and a nuclear submarine had been deployed to the region. But he said “we hope to God we never have to use” the arsenal.
During his first day in South Korea, Trump at least temporarily lowered the temperature on his previously incendiary language about the North. There were no threats of unleashing “fire and fury” on North Korea, as Trump previously warned, nor did the president revive his derisive nickname for North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un, “Little Rocket Man.”

  Talks to Sell Nuclear Submarines
Meanwhile, South Korea is negotiating with the US to buy nuclear-powered submarines to guard against threats from Pyongyang, local reports said Tuesday, as Trump said Seoul would buy “billions of dollars” of US weapons, AFP reported.
Nuclear-powered submarines can stay submerged for months, giving them a far greater range than their diesel-powered counterparts, and are also crucial to any seaborne nuclear deterrent.
Such a purchase would redraw the balance of power in northeast Asia, and could trigger a regional arms race.
Japan —another US ally— does not have nuclear-powered submarines, and is barred from having a military under its post-World War II pacifist constitution.
And while China’s increasingly powerful navy does include them in its fleet, Beijing would undoubtedly be infuriated by any such acquisition by Seoul.
After a summit in South Korea with his counterpart Moon Jae-In, Trump on Tuesday said Seoul would be buying a large amount of US weapons “whether it’s planes, whether it’s missiles, no matter what it is”. “South Korea will be ordering billions of dollars of that equipment, which for them makes a lot of sense and for us it means jobs, reducing our trade deficit with South Korea,” he said.

 

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