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Pope Condemns Terrorism in Name of Islam
International

Pope Condemns Terrorism in Name of Islam

Pope Francis has urged Muslim leaders around the world to condemn terrorism carried out in the name of Islam.
Speaking on board a flight back to Rome, the Pope said that he understood the harm caused by the stereotype that linked Islam with terrorism, the BBC reported.
He said a “global condemnation” of the violence would help the majority of Muslims dispel this stereotype.
Pope Francis was returning from a three-day visit to Turkey, where he discussed divisions between faiths.
The pontiff denounced people who say that “all Muslims are terrorists”.
“As we cannot say that all Christians are fundamentalists,” he said. In a joint declaration, the Pope and Patriarch Bartholomew I said: “We express our common concern for the current situation in Iraq, Syria and the whole Middle East.
“Many of our brothers and sisters are being persecuted and have been forced violently from their homes. It even seems that the value of human life has been lost, that the human person no longer matters and may be sacrificed to other interests. And, tragically, all this is met by the indifference of many.”
Patriarch Bartholomew is the spiritual leader of the world’s 250 million Orthodox Christians, whose Church broke with Rome in 1054 in a schism that divided the Christian world.
The pontiff and the patriarch also called for peace in Ukraine.
The Pope and the patriarch said: “We pray for peace in Ukraine, a country of ancient Christian tradition, while we call upon all parties involved to pursue the path of dialogue and of respect for international law in order to bring an end to the conflict and allow all Ukrainians to live in harmony.”
At the Blue Mosque on Saturday, one of the greatest masterpieces of Ottoman architecture, the Pope turned east towards Mecca, clasped his hands and paused for two minutes as the Grand Mufti of Istanbul, Rahmi Yaran, delivered a Muslim prayer.
The Pope then visited Hagia Sofia - which for almost 1,000 years was the most important Orthodox cathedral, then for nearly five centuries a mosque under the Ottomans, and is currently a museum.
For Istanbul, a city that passed from the Byzantines to the Ottomans, a place where religions, empires and cultures collided, the Pope’s message of interfaith dialogue has profound resonance, according to the BBC.

 

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