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Sa’adi’s Gulistan and Bustan in Nastaliq at Niavaran Museum

The displayed manuscript of Bustan was written in nastaliq in 1865 and the Gulistan manuscript, also in nastaliq, dates back to 1804
A sample of Sa’adi’s Bustan/ Golestan’s manuscript in nastaliqA sample of Sa’adi’s Bustan/ Golestan’s manuscript in nastaliq

As one of its periodical exhibits, the library of Niavaran Cultural Historic Complex in Tehran is displaying two precious Persian manuscripts. 
‘Gulistan’ and ‘Bustan’, the two major works of Persian poet Sa’adi (1213-1291), one of the greatest medieval Persian poets, are the two manuscripts on show. The books went on display on April 21 for ten days to mark Sa’adi Commemoration Day. 
The manuscript of Bustan was written in nastaliq (a traditionally predominant style in Persian calligraphy) by Mohammad Ibn Mahdi Ibn-Mohammad in 1865. The book is adorned with striking illuminations drawn by Mirza Abdul Vahab Maz’hab Bashi, Mehr News Agency reported on its Persian website.
Bustan (meaning orchard) was Sa’adi’s first work. The book contains the fruits of the poet’s long experience and his judgments on life, and contains a vast collection of anecdotes. It includes accounts of his travels and his analysis of human psychology. He often gives his accounts with fervor and advice similar to Aesop’s fables. 

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