12421
How Learning Artistic Skills Alters the Brain
Art And Culture

How Learning Artistic Skills Alters the Brain

New research finds neural changes not only reflected increased technical capacities, but also enhanced creativity.
“Creativity is another concept that is often thought of as something we are either born with or will never have,” says Dartmouth College psychologist Alexander Schlegel, lead author of a paper published in the journal NeuroImage. “Our data clearly refute this notion.”
Schlegel and his colleagues report that taking an introductory class in painting or drawing literally alters students’ brains. What’s more, these training-induced changes didn’t only improve the fine motor control needed for sophisticated sketching; they also boosted the students’ creative thinking.
Their study featured 35 college undergraduates, 17 of whom took a three-month introductory course in observational drawing or painting. All underwent monthly brain scans using of MRI technology.
At the beginning and end of the study, all participants completed a standard test of creative thinking, which measures such factors as fluency, originality, and the creative use of imagery and language.
During each of the monthly sessions, their brains were scanned under two conditions: as they “judged properties of illusory visual stimuli,” a test designed to track the development of their perceptual abilities; and as they made “quick, 30-second gesture drawings based on observations of human figures.”

  Observations
“We did not find any improvement in the art students’ purely perceptual skills or related brain activity relative to a control group of students who did not study art,” the researchers write. “We did, however, find that the art students improved in the ability to quickly translate observations of human figures into gesture drawings, and that fine-grained patterns of drawing-related neural activity in the cerebellum and cerebral cortex increasingly differentiated the art students from the control group over the course of the study.”
In other words, the researchers were able to watch as the students’ brains adapted to learning new skills. But more importantly, they also observed changes in their prefrontal white matter that corresponded to an increase in their ability to think creatively.
The art students specifically increased “their ability to think divergently, model systems and processes, and use imagery,” the researchers write. The results suggest that, in a matter of a few months, “prefrontal white matter reorganizes as (art students) become more able to think creatively.”

 

Short URL : http://goo.gl/XNsUCN

You can also read ...

Frankfurt University to Host DAVO Congress in October
The 25th International Congress of the German Middle East...
Behrangi’s Little Black Fish to Go on Stage
A play based on the well known children story, “The Little...
Shahram Nazeri to Sing in Kish and Tehran
Acclaimed master of traditional music and vocalist Shahram...
Portrait Exhibition at Vista Gallery
Vista Art Gallery in Tehran will hold an exhibition featuring...
Fayaz Bahram’s winning photo is the result of blending 56 shots taken with a 24-105mm lens.
Majlis Jumeirah Grand Mosque in Dubai is holding a photo...
Letting the Ego Go
A self-help book about the harm one’s ego can inflict and the...
Water Conscious Art on View at Laleh Gallery
To help raise public awareness about the significance of water...
Fantasy of Eternal Youth
A fantasy novella by Romanian author Mircea Eliade is...

Trending

Googleplus